Sep 20, 2016
|
Posted by: evgenia.tsenova
|
Category: English

People aged 45 and over at greater risk of heart disease if they work in sales, office support roles or service occupations
Those in management or professional roles are at lower risk, experts say
Heart disease is the leading cause of death around the world
Experts analyzed 7 key indicators of heart health - blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, exercise, diet, weight and smoking
Take simple steps, such as a walk at lunch, to improve health, say experts

Your job really could be killing you, experts have warned.
People aged over 45 are more likely to suffer heart disease and stroke if they work in sales, office support or service occupations, a new study today revealed.
Their colleagues in management or peers in professional jobs are less likely to be diagnosed with heart disease - the leading cause of death in the world.
While 88 per cent of workers aged 45 and older did not smoke, and 78 per cent had good blood sugar levels, fewer than 41 per cent had 'ideal cardiovascular health' in five other areas, researchers found.


They discovered a wide range of different heart risk, depending on a person's profession.
Researchers studied data relating to 5,566 employed men and women, who did not have a history of heart disease or stroke at the beginning of the study.
More than one in five transportation workers (22 per cent) were smokers, the highest smoking rate among all the groups.

Two out of three sales, office and administrative support employees (68 per cent) had poor eating habits, while 69 per cent of sales employees had high cholesterol.
Four out of five office and administrative support workers (82 per cent) didn't do enough physical activity.
People working in the food industry had the worst diet profile - with more than three-quarters (79 per cent) having poor diet quality.
Nine out of 10 police and firefighters (90 per cent) were overweight or obese, while 77 per cent suffered high cholesterol levels and 35 per cent had high blood pressure.
Management and professionals had better cardiovascular health overall than the other categories - a third had ideal weight, 75 per cent were at least moderately active, and just six per cent were smokers.
But, 72 per cent of white-collar professionals employed in business and finance workers had poor eating habits.
The researchers examined seven modifiable risk factors derived from the American Heart Association's 'Life's Simple 7' - an action plan for reducing heart disease and stroke risk.

Health in each area was scored as 'ideal,' 'intermediate' or 'poor.'
Workers earned ideal scores if, without medicines, their blood pressure readings were lower than 120/80 mm Hg; total cholesterol was below 200 mg/dL; and/or blood glucose was lower than 100 mg/dL while fasting or 140 without fasting.
Besides non-smoking status, a body mass index (BMI) below 25 and engaging in intense, break-a-sweat activity four or more times a week, including at work, were also judged ideal.
Lead researcher Captain Leslie MacDonald, senior scientist in the US Public Health Service, said: 'The lower the number of ideal cardiovascular risk factors, the easier it becomes to predict their future health ills, including premature death, heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.'
She said among the study's group of older workers, it was difficult to achieve ideal levels for all seven risk factors.
In fact, no one did, largely because of the difficulty achieving an ideal diet.
Workers' diets earned the top mark if they met at least four of five goals: consuming 4.5 or more cups of fruits or veg daily, 3.5 ounces of fish at least twice a week, less than 1,500 milligrams of sodium a day, 450 or fewer calories a week in sugary foods, and three or more servings of whole grains daily.
Captain MacDonald said work-related stress may also deplete workers' resolve to prioritise their health, but improving cardiovascular health is still possible.
She added: 'It's important to take small steps and not get overwhelmed or discouraged.'
Captain MacDonald said such small steps could include using lunch breaks to go for a walk rather than working through lunch, parking farther away from destinations, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.
Over time, she added, small steps accumulate into improved health.
The findings were presented at the American Heart Association's annual meeting.

Source:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/


NEWS

Page 1 of 22
Oct 18, 2016
|
English
PARIS – In a step forward for organ regeneration, stem cells grown from a single monkey’s skin cells revitalized the damaged hearts of five sick macaques, Japanese scientists reported Monday. The experiment builds toward the goal of providing a vast and noncontroversial source of rejuvenating cells to transplant into heart attack victims, researchers wrote in the science journal Nature.
 
Sep 20, 2016
|
English

People aged 45 and over at greater risk of heart disease if they work in sales, office support roles or service occupations
Those in management or professional roles are at lower risk, experts say
Heart disease is the leading cause of death around the world
Experts analyzed 7 key indicators of heart health - blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, exercise, diet, weight and smoking
Take simple steps, such as a walk at lunch, to improve health, say experts

Jul 25, 2016
|
English

It is estimated that digital data will reach 44 trillion gigabytes by 2020, a tenfold increase from figures in 2013. That's enough to create six stacks of computer tablets reaching the moon! Will there be enough storage? Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington (UW) are looking to address this issue by turning to DNA as a storage solution.
In a study, the researchers detailed a new technique they have developed which allowed them to successfully encode four image files worth of digital data into the nucleotide sequences of snippets of synthetic DNA.

  • Sofia, 8, Munich Str.
  • SSI Ltd. & Electron Cardio Ltd.
  • Office: +359 2 421 0 100
  • E-mail: office@temeo.org